GDS 73 - Digital Photography Online - Weekly Instructions
Fall 2020- Section 74835


Aug. 31 - Week 1 Instructions:

  1. Welcome to the class!
  2. Note: If you have not done this already, try to figure out a regular(maybe daily)time when you can work on the class. It can help in online classes. Procrastinating is not advised ;)
    There are some other good tips for online learning here at
    8 STRATEGIES FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF AN ONLINE CLASS
  3. Login to Canvas (https://wvm.instructure.com) and download the syllabus in Canvas from the class home page near the top if you don't have it.
  4. See the class links sidebar on this page for Canvas and online learning related links.
  5. Watch the Orientation for the class. Make sure to refer to the current version of the syllabus when viewing the orientation. The syllabus can be found in Canvas from the class home page near the top. The link to all video lectures is near the top of this page. The books or other details may have changed from the video. The current syllabus has the most up to date information.
  6. Read the General Class Information in Canvas (https://wvm.instructure.com). It may be slightly different than the video or syllabus.
  7. Please let me know if you are confused or having trouble with the material. Post most or all of your questions in the question discussion forum in Canvas under the discussions link. If your question is more personal, you can message me through Canvas (https://wvm.instructure.com), by logging in, clicking on the class, clicking on the inbox link on the left, and creating a message. It's like email inside the class.
  8. Optional Office hours: Generally Mondays 4:30PM - 6:00PM and Tuesdays 9:00AM - 11:00AM through Zoom. Check the Announcements section in Canvas for links to the zoom office hours. You can talk to me live at those times to ask questions, etc.
  9. Assignment:
    Post in the
    "Introductions" discussion forum in Canvas. Give a short introduction to yourself, and about your expectations for the class.
    You can find the discussion forum under the Discussions link on the left or the Content Links module. I will check this to verify you are in the class. Make sure to reply to the post as soon as possible to avoid being dropped.
  10. Mission College tutoring is now online, and there is tutoring for some of our classes if you need it.
  11. We do use photoshop and Lightroom in the class.
    Many things can be done in both Lightroom and Photoshop, and photographers use both. Lightroom is better for organizing and processing lots of images, while Photoshop can do some image manipulation that Lightroom cannot, such as compositing images(assembling multiple images into one). So, we will talk about and use both, sometimes for similar functions. You can decide later which program you want to use for certain functions, situations or workflows.
    For this class you can use either the full Creative Cloud plan or the Creative Cloud Photography plan.
    1. You can also find current the Adobe Creative Cloud for Semester License at http://store.collegebuys.org/. This might be the best deal right now at $39.99 for 6 months
    2. Adobe software like Photoshop and Lightroom are usually available in the Academic Support Center on Campus(not currently available due to Covid-19). Check their web site for current hours. http://missioncollege.edu/depts/academic_support/
    3. Please let me know if you do not have adequate computer hardware, internet access, or can't afford the $40 for the Adobe software.
  12. Take the Opening Day Survey in the Week 1 module in Canvas.
  13. Watch the video on Camera Features.
    1. Note: The main criteria for a camera to use in this class is one with manual exposure controls like Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, etc. You could get by without these controls, but you will be limited. See below for more details and recommendations.
    2. Here is a page on with camera buying guides by budget, camera type, etc.
    3. There is a guide here with cameras that have manual controls that would work for the class.
    4. A cell phone is not really good enough.
  14. Check out this page on Exposure Modes, which are important in the class(your camera needs to have these modes). We will talk a lot more about these modes in the class.
  15. Check out these sites for more camera suggestions
  16. Optional: Watch the video Introduction to Flickr.
    Note:
    The Flickr interface can change at any time, so the site may be slightly different from the video, but I think you can figure it out ;).
  17. Optional:
    Join our Flickr group https://www.flickr.com/groups/gds73_online_fall2020/
    1. You can share images from your assignments in the group, and see the images from other students. This is usually optional.
    2. Sign up for Flickr.
    3. Go to the link for the group above and click join this group.

Sept. 7 - Week 2 - Instructions:

  1. There are a few videos this week, but some are optional. We want to get going quickly with the photography :)
  2. Watch the video about Exposure (the link to a page with all the video lectures is also near the top of this page). This is one of the most important videos!
  3. Watch the video on Exposure Modes. This may help a lot with Assignment 1, but you can do assignment 1 without watching this video first if you want.
  4. For Canon Users. Watch the video Camera Controls 1 - Canon SLR on digital SLR cameras. This one goes over a Canon Camera, which a lot of you have, but it also will help with any digital SLR.
  5. Optional this week for Canon Users: Watch the video on Camera Controls 2 - Menus and Quick Control(Canon) , if that is what type of camera you have. I would highly recommend this video if you have a Canon camera, and it can also help with most other digital Cameras, because a lot of the concepts are the same.
  6. For Nikon users. Watch the video on Camera Controls 3 - Nikon SLR, if that is what type of camera you have. It is not as in depth as the first 2 camera control videos, but covers some Nikon specific things.
  7. Optional: Watch the video on Camera Controls 4 - Point and Shoot, if that is what type of camera you have. I think most of you have a larger camera, but some may have a smaller, compact camera.
  8. For the next 2 videos, you can follow along with your own files if you want. You will use the techniques to turn in your first assignment.

    1. Watch the video Importing and Exporting files with Lightroom.
    2. Watch the video Web Gallery Export with Lightroom.
    3. Please let me know if you do not yet have access to Lightroom Classic. The Adobe Creative cloud with Lightroom Classic is avaiable for $40/six months at https://foundationccc.org/CollegeBuys

      Important Note:
      You may be wondering why we are talking about importing with both Photoshop/Bridge and Lightroom Classic?
      Photoshop/Bridge and Lightroom Classic are required for the course. Photoshop, Bridge and Lightroom come with either the full Creative Cloud Complete plan or the Creative Cloud Photography plan. Many things can be done in both Lightroom Classic and Photoshop, and photographers use both. Lightroom Classic is better for organizing and processing lots of images, while Photoshop can do some image manipulation that Lightroom cannot, such as compositing images(assembling multiple images into one). So, we will talk about and use both, sometimes for similar functions. You can decide later which program you want to use for certain functions, situations or workflows.
  9. Optional: Here is more information on importing into Lightroom Classic from Adobe if you want to check it out.
  10. Optional: Here is a video from Adobe with more information on exporting and printing from Lightroom Classic.
  11. Optional: In the discussion forums, there is an optional forum to post images that you are taking that you would like to share with the class. Feel free to share there and/or in the flickr group so we can see what everybody is doing, outside of assignments.
    1. Here is how to embed an image into a discussion.
    2. Here is how to embed an image from your Canvas files into a discussion.
  12. If you have time, check out Chapter One. Shooting Natural Light Portraits Like a Pro from The Digital Photography Book, Part 5:Photo Recipes for tips that will help with Assignment 1. We will come back to this information later too.
  13. Assignment 1 - First Shots - Practice Assignment:
    • Go outside and shoot portraits of one person
    • Note: Since you may be in a restricted environment due to Covid-19, you should choose someone from your household to shoot pictures of for this Assignment. Please DO NOT need to take any risks or break any rules to do this assignment. Be safe. You can shoot these at your home with someone in your household. Please let me know if you do not have anyone else at your location that you can photograph.
    • We are just getting started, so don't worry if you think your images aren't what you would like.
    • Make sure to shoot original images for each assignment. Do NOT use older images that you shot before the class.
    • Try out manual controls if you have them, and if you know how to use them. Don't worry if you don't. We will go over them later.
    • Try some images posed and some candid
    • Try some images with the subject looking into the camera, and some not
    • Try some close-ups and some wider, full length shots
    • Try some with flash and without flash
    • See example 1 here
    • See example 2 here
    • Shoot at least 30 images
    • The examples have 30 images or so. You will only turn in 10.
    • Download with Lightroom(watch the video tutorials above)
      • Please let me know if you do not yet have access to Lightroom Classic. The Adobe Creative cloud with Lightroom Classic is avaiable for $40/six months at https://foundationccc.org/CollegeBuys
    • Pick your 10 best images. Turn in your 10 best images only.
    • Make sure you have watched Importing with Adobe Bridge and Web Gallery Export with Lightroom, and turn in EITHER a web gallery, or 10 separate images.
    • You have 2 ways you can turn in the images
      • DO NOT turn in your 10 original image files. They will probably be really big.
      • Make sure you have watched Importing and Exporting files with Lightroom and Web Gallery Export with Lightroom.
      • Option 1: Create a web gallery using Adobe Lightroom Classic. Use the procedures in the video Web Gallery Export with Lightroom to format a web gallery of your 10 images. If you do the web gallery option, please use one of the templates under the section "Classic Gallery Templates" for your gallery. In the setting panel on the right, set the image size under "Image Pages" to 1000px. When you submit, make sure to include all the whole folder that Lightroom makes, which has all the files inside, not just one file. If you don't include all the files, the website that Lightroom makes will not work on my end.
      • Option 2: Export 10 separate jpeg images in Lightroom Classic to turn in. Use the procedures in the video Importing and Exporting files with Lightroom to format your 10 images. Export as jpeg images with a maximum dimension of 1200 pixels wide or 1200 pixels high in Lightroom. Make sure your name is on your folder before compressing the folder to submit in Canvas (See below).
    • After creating your files:
      To turn in assignments with multiple files or folders, it works best if you put all files in a folder and zip the folder. It is important to name your folder correctly BEFORE you zip it to send, so I know who's folder it is. Please name you folder like this firstname_lastname_assignX where X is the assignment number. To zip a folder on a PC, create the folder with your name on it and put the files needed in it, then right click, select "send to," and finally "compresses (zipped) folder." On a mac, control click or right click on the folder and select compress. Name the folder before compressing it, so I can see whose it is when it is uncompressed.
    • Drop your zipped file in the Assignment 1 drop box in Canvas. Check the calendar for due dates.

Sept. 14 - Week 3 - Instructions:

  1. Optional: If you have a Canon Camera, here is another video on The Q Button – What Every Canon DSLR Photographer Needs to Know
  2. Make sure to watch the video on Exposure Modes if you didn't watch it yet(or watch it again since it is so great ;)
  3. Watch this video on using the histogram on your camera(Youtube video, not by Mark)
  4. Watch the video on Exposure Compensation
    • This one can help with the Locations Explorations assignment below
  5. Watch the video Importing with Adobe Bridge. Bridge is used with Photoshop to view and process multiple files.
  6. Watch the video on Image Processing and Renaming Files with Bridge and Photoshop
    • NOTE: The Image Processor in the video can now be found in Photoshop by going to the File Menu, and then scripts. It is no longer available in Bridge as of Spr 18.
      The export dialog in Lightroom is under the file menu.
  7. Watch the video on The Benefits and Use of Tripods
  8. Watch A Master at Work: Sir Don McCullin Kolkata, which shows one of the great photographers at work.
  9. Optional: Watch the Joel Meyerowitz video on street photography
    • The video quality is not great, but it's a nice intro to street photography
  10. Assignment 2 - Location Explorations - Main Assignment:
    Put yourself in 2 locations, and make photographs only of subjects you can see from where you are standing, without walking around. Again, since you may be in a restricted environment due to Covid-19, you can choose both locations from where you are, such as at home or wherever you are. Please DO NOT need to take any risks or break any rules to find both locations. Home is fine if that works.
    You can move up or down(squat). Really look around! Change your perspective. You can turn around, get low, point up or down, etc. You can also use a tripod if you want or need to. You can also use the zoom on your lens if you want to. Pay close attention to framing, composition and exposure. Don't include people in this one. Try to create images that you like, as well as images that you think others might like. Make sure you get 10 quality images.

    Document 1 indoor scene and 1 outdoor scene with 5 quality images each. So, you should be showing 2 different locations, 5 shots each. Get as many as you can from each spot, thinking of all possible images, and then pick your best 10.

    Also, always make sure to shoot new, original images for each assignment. Please do not turn in old images that may fit the assignment.

    Take a look at some examples. Download examples here. These are from a slightly different version of this assignment, where the photographers moved between shots. You will not be moving this time(except for up and down.

    Tip: You may want to use a tripod indoors if the light is low, so you will not get blurring from camera shake. Watch the video on The Benefits and Use of Tripods(Youtube video) for more information on tripods.

    • Think about the camera settings for each shot(if your camera has manual controls).
      • f-stop(aperture)
      • shutter speed
      • ISO
      • shooting mode(manual, aperture priority, etc.)
      • general focal length(wide angle, normal or telephoto)
      • These terms are in your reading and on the terms page.
    • Experiment with the controls you do have on your camera.
    • Experiment with different angles, focal lengths, f-stops(If possible) and shutter speeds(If possible).
    • Make sure to shoot at least 1 image using each of the following settings(if your camera allows it).
      Check out pages 38 and 147-157 of the Betterphoto Basics book(if you are using the kindle version, look for aperture priority in Step 1 and Step 5), and the terms page for a description of some of these exposure modes.
      • aperture priority
      • shutter priority
      • manual exposure
      • manual focus
    • To Turn in:
    • Do not do a web gallery for this assignment. You will just turn in separate files. (See details below)
    • Resize your images to a maximum dimension of 1000 pixels wide or 1000 pixels high(watch the video Image Processing and Renaming Files with Bridge and Photoshop) and save them as jpegs with a quality setting of 7.
      • If you don't resize to this size, Canvas might not upload the file.
      • NOTE: The Image Processor can now be found in Photoshop by going to the File Menu, and then scripts. It is no longer available in Bridge as of Spr 18.
        The export dialog in Lightroom is under the file menu.
      • You could also import into Lightroom Classic instead of Bridge, and export from Lightroom Classic, following the procedures in the video Importing and Exporting files with Lightroom. Use the same 1000x1000 pixel size from above in the export window, but use quality 70 instead of 7(The Lightroom quality slider goes to 100!)
    • Make sure your images are named like this:
      firstname_lastname_assign2_datecreated_imagenumber.jpg
      • Watch the video on image processing to rename files quickly
      • Use your own name and date of course.
      • Make sure your name is on each image.
    • Put your 10 images only in a folder named firstname_lastname_assign2(use your name), zip the folder and drop them into the Canvas drop box for the assignment.
      • To turn in assignments with multiple files or folders, it works best if you put all files in a folder and zip the folder. It is important to name your folder correctly BEFORE you zip it to send, so I know who's folder it is. Please name you folder like this firstname_lastname_assignX where X is the assignment number. Then when you zip the folder, I will know it is yours. To zip the folder: To zip a folder on a PC, create the folder with your name on it like this firstname_lastname_assignX and put the files needed in it, then right click, select "send to," and finally "compresses (zipped) folder". On a mac, control click or right click on the folder and select compress. Remember to name the folder before compressing it, so I can see who's it is when it is uncompressed.
    • Optional: Post your favorite indoor shot and your favorite outdoor shot to your flickr account and add them to the group page:

Sept. 21 - Week 4 - Instructions:

  1. Note: There has been a little confusion regarding which version of Lightroom I am referring to in the instructions. If I mention Lightroom in the class, I am almost always talking about Lightroom Classic, which is the desktop version of lightroom, not the one named just Lightroom, which is more mobile oriented. Confusing huh? Adobe did it not me ;)
  2. A reminder: Mission College tutoring is now online, and there is tutoring for this class if you need it.
  3. Reading for this week.
    Go over Chapter One. The Image Frame from The Photographers Eye
  4. Review the terms page
  5. Read the files on thinking about photos and the file on critique procedure.
  6. Watch the video What Makes a Good Photo
  7. Assignment: Take a look at the images submitted for Assignment 1, and then comment on 1 image from someone else in the discussion forum called Assignment 1 Discussion. Tell us one image from the assignment that you liked and why. We are looking for factors that can make a portrait more interesting or aesthetically pleasing in some way. It could be lighting, expression, etc. Basically, what can make a portrait "good", whatever that means to you?
    Read the files on thinking about photos and the file on critique procedure for ideas on what to talk about. Here is the link to the Assignment 1 images.
  8. Watch the video on Introduction to Adobe Bridge
  9. Assignment: Complete the Camera Survey Assignment in Canvas
    • Make sure to answer all the questions, using your camera manual when you need to. If you don't have your manual, you can usually download it.
  10. Assignment 3: Collect 5 photos from a photographer of your choice. They can be the work of any kind of photographer(commercial, artist, photojournalist, etc). The work can be straight or manipulated. Check the calendar in Canvas for due dates.
    To Turn in:
    1. Resize your images to a maximum dimension of 1200 pixels wide or 1200 pixels high(watch the video Image Processing and Renaming Files with Bridge and Photoshop) and save them as jpegs with a quality setting of 7 or higher, or see other methods below.
      • If you don't resize to this size, Canvas might not upload the file.
      • NOTE: The Image Processor can now be found in Photoshop by going to the File Menu, and then scripts. It is no longer available in Bridge as of Spr 18.
        The export dialog in Lightroom is under the file menu.
      • You can also now export directly from Bridge using the export panel as of Bridge 2020. See the quick tip on exporting to jpegs from Bridge here.
      • You could also import into Lightroom Classic instead of Bridge, and export from Lightroom Classic, following the procedures in the video Importing and Exporting files with Lightroom. Use the same 1200x1200 pixel size from above in the export window, but use quality 70 instead of 7(The Lightroom quality slider goes to 100!)
    2. Make sure your images are named like this:
      photographersfirstname_photographers lastname
      _assign3_imagenumber.jpg
      • Watch the video on Image Processing and Renaming Files with Bridge and Photoshop and/or Importing and Exporting files with Lightroom to rename files quickly. You could also export from Bridge 2020.
    3. Upload your 5 images only to the assignment in Canvas. Do not zip the files this this time, so other students can see later. Upload the images as 5 separate files with your submission.

Sept. 28 - Week 5 - Instructions:

  1. Assignment: Peer Review of Assignment 3
    Review some images submitted by other students for Assignment 3. Here is the link to use to see the images. Take a look at all the images. In the Discussion forum called "Assignment 3 Discussion", talk about why you like or don't like one or more images from a certain photographer, or why you think the images are interesting or significant. DO NOT comment in the dropbox.com folder, comment in the discussion forum in Canvas. Do this first post by Sunday. Also reply to a post by another student by Monday.
  2. Adobe Lightroom was split into 2 version around October 2017.
    Watch this video on Lightroom CC or Lightroom Classic CC - Which Workflow is Best for You?

    (We will be using the Lightroom Classic Version)
  3. Watch the video Introduction to Lightroom Classic)
    Important Notes:
    Adobe Lightroom was split into 2 version around October 2017.
    Basically the Classic version is more like the previous desktop version. There is also Lightroom CC, which is targeted more for mobile devices. Confusing? Yes. Many people are upset they must now pay a subscription to keep access to Lightroom. They do not want to trust a lifetime of work to software they must rent and cannot "buy" anymore. That being said, we will continue to use Lightroom Classic in the class for at least the immediate future, since it is still kind of a standard. Also, your images are not stuck in Lightroom Classic if you quit the subscription. Since Lightroom edits are non-destructive, your original images are still just fine on your hard drive, but your "edits" are in Lightroom. I will be on the lookout for other possible replacements, however. If you have any suggestions, such as Luminar, let me know. Feel free to use either version of Lightroom in the class if you want, and it makes sense for what you are doing, but the videos are using the desktop version unless noted.
  4. Here is a page from Adobe with many video tutorials on Lightroom Classic. This is the version we will be using.
  5. Here is a page from Adobe with many tutorials on Lightroom CC. We won't be using Lightroom CC too much. It is a more consumer oriented, cloud based app whcih might be better for mobile photography, like with your phone. We won't be using Lightroom CC in the class, but you can use it on your own. It's a free country...
  6. Important! Watch the video about Depth of Field
  7. Important! Watch the video about Focal Length
  8. Important! Watch the Shutter Speed/Depth of Field Assignment Intro video
  9. Assignment 4 - Main Assignment - Shutter speed and depth of field:
    Shoot photos of 2 different scenes exploring the effect of shutter speed and changes in depth of field.

    • Make sure to watch the intro video Shutter Speed/Depth of Field Assignment Intro
    • Also, make sure to shoot original images for each assignment. Do NOT use older images that you shot before the class.
    • Look at examples here.
    • Scene 1:
      Shoot images with different shutter speeds. You should have images with a slow shutter speed, like 1/15 second, and a fast shutter speed, like 1/500 second.
      • These 5 images can be of the same scene, or even the same exact composition, just with different shutter speed settings.
      • Set your camera to Shutter Priority mode if it has that setting.
      • The aperture will change to compensate for faster or slower shutter speeds.
      • This part of the exercise will work best on subjects that are moving.
    • Scene 2:
      Shoot images with different apertures. You should have some images where you used a small aperture, and some with a large aperture.
      • These 5 images can be of the same scene or composition, with different depths of field evident in the shots.
      • Set your camera to Aperture Priority if it has that setting.
      • The shutter speed will change to compensate for smaller or larger apertures.
      • This part of the exercise will work best on scenes with objects in the foreground and background.
    • If you do not have direct control of shutter speed and aperture, like on a point and shoot, try to use the controls you do have, like scenes, or factors like the distance to your subject to change the depth of field. Some scenes, like sports for example, might use a faster shutter speed. You will need to experiment. Use your manual to figure out the effect of different scene settings.

    Turn in exactly 5 images that show different shutter speeds and exactly 5 images that show different depth of field.
    Please shoot new images for all assignments. Do not turn in old images you have taken previously.

    • To Turn in:
    • Resize your images to a maximum dimension of 1000 pixels wide or 1000 pixels high(watch the video on image processing) and save them as jpegs with a quality setting of 7. You can also export at that size from Lightroom with a quality of 70, or You can now export directly from Bridge using the export panel as of Bridge 2020. See the quick tip on exporting to jpegs from Bridge here.
    • Make sure your images are named like this:
      firstname_lastname_ assign4_datecreated_imagenumber.jpg
      • Watch the video on image processing or use bridge to rename files quickly
      • Use your own name and date of course.
    • Put your 10 images only in a folder named firstname_lastname_assign4(use your name), zip the folder and drop them into the Canvas drop box for the assignment. It is important to name your folder correctly BEFORE you zip it to send, so I know who's folder it is.
    • Check the calendar for Due dates.

Oct. 5 - Week 6 - Instructions:

  1. Watch the video on White Balance
  2. Here are more camera specific white balance instructions
  3. Watch the video on Keywords and Collections in Lightroom
  4. Watch the video about Scanning
  5. Watch at least the minutes 2-10 of Masters of photography - Diane Arbus
    • (The woman who is onscreen at 2:00 is her daughter)
  6. Assignment 5 - Main Assignment - Object photos:
    Photograph 1 object in many different ways. The same object is your subject in every photo. Examples for objects would be a chair or guitar. It can be any object, but not a person or animal. Be as creative as you can. You can move the object, change the lighting, etc. You can try to create some abstract images, where the actual object is not recognizable. Think about all the options you have with 1 main subject only. Please do not shoot images of many different objects. Shoot at least 40 images total. Select your 20 best, then select your 5 best images. They can be manipulated or straight. See Examples Here.

    For help, consider the following list of characteristics of images:

    To turn in

    • Resize your 20 best images to a maximum dimension of 1000 pixels wide or 1000 pixels high(watch the video on image processing) and save them as jpegs with a quality setting of 7. You can also export at that size from Lightroom with a quality of 70. You can also export them using bridge, whcich might be the easiest now(here is a video).
    • Using the same techniques as used previously, make sure your images are named like this:
      firstname_lastname_assign5_imagenumber.jpg
    • Turn in as a folder of 20 files, with your 5 selects(best of the best) in an inside folder.
    • Zip the folder and put the file in the assignment in Canvas.
    • If you have an Instagram account, try to post post 1 of your images there, and tag it with #photographyatmission. To do this, you can email the image you have chosen to yourself, and post from your phone. There are other methods, but this may be the simplest.
    • Optional: Post your 5 selects to your flickr account and add them to the group page:


Oct. 12 - Week 7 - Instructions:

  1. Reading this week. Read Chapter 1, The Five Characteristics of Light, from Lighting for Digital Photography:From Snapshots to Great Shots.
    1. This will help with framing your subject for Assignment 5(and others)
    2. You should be able to get free access to this material by signing up using the instructions here:
      Here are the instructions for obtaining a free Oreilly Safari Books online account.
  2. Watch this video on Henri Cartier-Bresson
  3. Discussion:
    Write a post by Thursday about something interesting from the video on Henri Cartier Bresson, and/or the reading on the Five Characteristics of Light. It could be an idea Bresson mentions about his method, or an image that moved you in some way. The discussion forum is called "Bresson and Light Discussion". Also, respond to at least one other person's post by Monday.
  4. Watch the video on Visual Weight/Point of Emphasis
  5. Important Note: There were some significant interface changes made this month(June 2020) to Adobe Camera Raw, so depending on what version you have, the interface may look different from the video and some of the exercises. Most of the functionality is the same however.
  6. Watch the video on Introduction to Camera Raw
  7. Assignment 6: Go through Chapter 1 of the Adobe Photoshop CC Book for Digital Photographers - 2017 Version - by Scott Kelby (The Kelby Book from now on).
    Follow the procedures under the section Putting It All Together on pages 26-27 of the printed book
    (about 2/3 of the way through Ch. 1). The chapter has instructions on how to open a jpeg in Camera Raw(the image is a jpeg). Save the edited file as a jpeg and drop it into the Assignment 6 folder. The original starting file can be found here: http://kelbyone.com/books/cc17/ under Chapter 1 – Raw and Un-Kutt
    If you are using a digital version of the book, the page number might be different. Look for the exercise with this image(minus the text and blur).
    Ch. 6 Image
  8. Watch the video Garry Winogrand and his Crooked Horizon Lines [Street Photography Tips]

Oct. 19 - Week 8 - Instructions:

  1. Assignment: Go through Chapter 2 of the Adobe Photoshop CC Book for Digital Photographers by Scott Kelby. I will not collect these finished files, but you do need to know the material. You can download all files for the Kelby Book here.
  2. Assignment 7: Watch the video Processing a Scanned Image in Photoshop or Lightroom. Recreate the 1st version of the final image in the video by following the same procedure in Photoshop.
    Recreate the image with the cat(you'll know what I mean when you see it ;) using Photoshop, not the second demonstration in Lightroom.
    The original starting file is here. After you are done, save the file as a jpeg and drop it into the assignment drop box in Canvas.
    Note on the video: If you have a newer version of photoshop, you can use Smart Sharpen or the Unsharp Mask filter as used in the video to sharpen your image. More videos on sharpening in Adobe CC can be seen here.
  3. Assignment: Take the Midpoint Survey in the weekly folder

Oct. 26 - Week 9 - Instructions:

  1. Office hours this week are slightly different - Mon 4:30PM - 6:00 and Thursday 10:30AM - 12:30PM
    (No Tuesday Hours)
  2. Optional: Watch this video on online photo editing with pixlr.com
  3. The Adobe Max Conference was last week, and I think you still may be able to see most of the sessions for Photographers recorded. There is some good stuff to see. Here are the sessions for Photographers.
  4. Watch this quick video about photographer Weegee.
  5. This content was intended to help with the regular(non-COVID) version of Assigment 8, which was portraits, but we are scrapping that assignment for now because of our current situation. I have a newer assignment 8 below. You should still check out this material though as it can help with your portraits in the future, and the material may appear on a quiz or test. :)
    1. Watch the video The Effect of Focal Length on Portraits.
    2. Watch the video Bounce for Portrait Lighting on using reflectors.
    3. For more tips, watch these additional videos on shooting portraits with bounce.
      1. Using reflectors and diffusers outdoors(Lastolight Video)
      2. How to bounce light with Foam Core - Lighting Techniques
      3. Using Reflectors in Photography(Youtube video)
    4. Watch this video on shooting portraits with on camera flash.
      1. Using fill flash(Youtube video)
    5. Make sure you have read tips for photographing people with natural light located here. and More Tips for Portraits located here.
    6. Check out the file The_dPS_Ultimate_Guide_to_People_and_Portrait_Photography.pdf in the Canvas weekly module for more tips on portraits to use on the Portrait Assignment.
  6. Go through Chapter 3 of the Adobe Photoshop CC Book for Digital Photographers by Scott Kelby. I will not collect these finished files, but you should know the material. You can download all files for the Kelby Book here.
  7. Watch the video The silent drama of photography | Sebastião Salgado He is one the worlds most respected documentary photographers. It can inspire you for Assignment 8 below.
  8. Optional: As you work on Assignment 8, you can post some pictures in the discussion forum "Weekly Image Share" so we can all see what everyone is doing.
  9. Assignment: Take Midterm Quiz in Canvas which covers the reading and videos.
    The Quiz is open book and open note, but do not collaborate with anyone on the quiz. There is no time limit.
  10. Assignment 8 - Main Assignment
    Life in a Pandemic
    • Try to present images to us that show what your life is like at this point and how it feels.
    • Shoot in Raw format if you can, and process the images in Adobe Camera Raw, making any adjustments you wish using the techniques in Chapters 1 and 2 of the Photoshop Book
    • You can use images from a cellphone for this assignment as well. Feel free to edit the images in Camera Raw or Lightroom.

    To Turn in(Please read carefully):

    • Pick Your 5-10 best images and process them in Camera Raw and resize your images to a maximum dimension of 1000 pixels wide or 1000 pixels high(watch the videos on image processing and importing/exporting in Lightroom.)
    • Save them as jpegs with a quality setting of 7 for the image processor in Photoshop, or 70 in Lightoom.
    • Please DO NOT turn in your Raw files. They are too big and may cause problems for Canvas.
    • Make sure your images are named like this:
      firstname_lastname_imagenumber.jpg
    • Make sure your name is on each image.
    • Put only your 5-10 best images in a folder, zip the folder and drop them into Assignment 8 in the weekly module.